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Ben

Ben

I may not agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it - Voltaire.

Posted by on in Computer Vision In Embedded Systems

The Raspberry Pi camera module board (Rev 1.3) has been identified by the hobbyist embedded community as an inexpensive camera that would be ideal for computer vision projects. However, the camera may not be usable outside of the Raspberry Pi community, due to the closed source nature of its interface's timing and data characteristics.

 This means that to understand how it works, in order to use it in our hobbyist computer vision projects, we may need to hook it up to one of our FPGA boards and perform some "creative" engineering. This should provide some insight into how it operates, which should be right up our alley with us being FPGA "experts" and all. Hence, in this blog post we investigate what would be required to use the Raspberry Pi camera module with our FPGA development kits and projects.

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Posted by on in Robotics Using FPGAs

I had time last weekend to begin assembling the skeleton of the 17 Degrees-of-Freedom (DOF) robot. For this build I decided to start the assembly with the feet and build  my way upwards. Why start with the feet? Well because, as explained in my previous post, the kit I bought did not come with an instruction manual and building from the bottom up seemed to make sense, to me anyway.

However, as it turned out the build is easier than one is first led to believe, as it soon becomes obvious what parts should be connected to what. This blog post is the first part, of what might turn out to be many, which describe my assembly of the 17 DOF robot.

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Tagged in: 17 DOF Robot MPU-6050
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Posted by on in En Vacances

Puy du Fou is a popular historical themed park in Western France. It is particularly good for parents who wish to sneak in a history lesson or two, in the pretext of a day out, to their unsuspecting kids on their summer holiday. The shows or history lessons depending how you see them, which includes The Three Musketeers, The Vikings and King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table amongst others, are all acted out in sweltering temperatures to appreciative audiences. We were part of that audience this summer and pictures from one of the shows we watched, The Secret of the Lance, are the subject of this blog post.

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Posted by on in En Vacances

The bulk of our summer vacation was spent in the town of Saint-Jean-des-Monts on the west coast of France. We liked it so much last year that we decided to go back again this year, immediately after our stopover at Clecy. As usual we took our mountain bikes with us and had a thoroughly good time. Why do we like it so much? Well, that is what this blog post is about.

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Posted by on in DC Motor Controllers

When most of us get to grips with applying power to a DC motor, to watch it spin round, usually our next task is to determine how fast it is spinning that is, determine it's speed of rotation. There are many different ways of measuring a DC motor's speed including using an optical encoder. Before using a FPGA to automate the task we firstly measured the DC motor's speed of rotation by connecting the digital and analog outputs of a photo-sensor board to an oscilloscope. What we discovered during this first phase of measurements is the subject of this blog post. 

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