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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Mac OS X

Posted by on in 3D Printing, Modelling and Character Animation

I have used AutoCAD on and off for the last couple of years and can get most CAD designs completed using it, by hook or crook. Although, not always in the most pleasing of timescales, which really doesn't matter that much as they are generally for non-commercial purposes. 123D Design is a free CAD alternative, although not entirely free, that is also used for 3D modelling.

Today it seems that a lot of the features of AutoCAD have been incorporated into 123D Design. Hence, from what I have read the core engine used to drive AutoCAD is in fact the same one used in 123D Design. To test if this is the case I decided to undertake my next 3D design project using 123D on Mac OS X and make my efforts the subject of this and subsequent posts in this category.

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Posted by on in Development, Software and Tools

If you like a blog post with a happy ending then this blog post has one, but only just. This particular post is about me against Yosemite (10.10) when attempting to install Bugzilla. This time  I won, but barely and the victory wasn't pretty to see. All the same I won albeit with a complete lack of composure at the end. 

 With two big projects coming up I just had to get Bugzilla working, no matter what. So finally getting it to work was more out of desperation than  anything else. Although, because it took so long it did mean that I was not able to begin some other work, as planned. Anyway enough of the waffle here is the story, as it unfolded.

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Tagged in: Mac OS X Yosemite
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Posted by on in Development, Software and Tools

 Every now and again the digital design engineer has to completely leave his (or her) comfort zone and enter the occult of analog design engineers. It is in this world that digital design engineers, used to making yes or no binary decisions, are presented with a multiple of answers all of which, or none, may be correct.  It is in this blurry and murky world that any type of help, to corroborate a design, is most welcome. 

As part of designing a servo controller board for the 17 DOF Robot (Using FPGAs) Project I had to enter such a world. However, rather than approach the design with Wigi (Ouija) board to hand, to confirm my results, I  simulated the circuit design using the electronic equivalent or a Software Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis, otherwise known as SPICE. The installation of LTspice IV on Mac OS X (Yosemite 10.10) is the subject of this blog post. 

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Posted by on in Development, Software and Tools

KiCad is an open source software suite for Electronic Design Automation (EDA) that facilitates the creation of professional schematics and Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs) of up to 32 copper layers. It runs on Windows, Linux and Apple's OS X. One of the things we like about KiCad, apart from it being endorsed by CERN, is this multi-platform support. We also like the fact that it is released under the open-source GNU GPL v2 free of charge.

However, free does not mean free of functionality, on the contrary. This is a fully-fledged, feature rich EDA tool, that we will be using from now on to design our PCBs. Also, because the software is available to our readers too, our design files should be freely available once we switch over to Git Hub. Installing KiCad on a Macbook Air with Mavericks 10.9.5 is the topic of this blog post. 

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Posted by on in Development, Software and Tools

 As the title of this blog suggests this post is about installing and building an application using XCode on a Mac OS X system in general and on a Mac OS X with Mavericks 10.9.5 installed in particular. The purpose of the installation is to use it to program an OpenGL example from the legendary OpenGL red book.

However, while installing Xcode is straightforward understanding the mechanisms required to run an OpenGL example are not. For example, should one install MacPorts, XQuartz, both or neither to run X11 applications? Should Glut or FreeGlut be installed? The decisions I made to compile and run a basic OpenGL tutorial are the subject of this blog post.

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